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Tuesday 20th March 2018

Brits Prepare for Trump’s Visit in Unusual Ways

Lifestyle & Health

Hannah Bardsley

Wed, 11 Jul 2018 16:09 GMT

President Trump is due to land in Britain on the July 11th, arriving from the Brussels Nato summit on Thursday afternoon. It seems odd that he should be arriving so soon, for like Christmas or high school graduation we have been talking about this moment for what feels like years.

Not everyone is excited, after all Trump has mixed reviews in his own country, and public opinion of him in Britain is even lower. But that is hardly surprising, as in Britain it is traditional not to like anyone in power – apart from the Queen, who the British public lovingly refer to as ‘a good one.’ 

We know how the government are preparing for Trump’s visit, his itinerary, when and how he will meet the Queen, the British Prime Minister Theresa May: it is all very exciting. But what are the British public doing to prepare for this momentous occasion? How are they celebrating, because some indeed are? And how are they commemorating it? Are there mugs with Trump’s face on one side, the Queen’s on the other? Will there be street parties? Perhaps not, but England is definitely getting into the spirit of things and marking the occasion. 

At a time when you would expect every club to be marketing to the football crowd, enticing patrons in with a promise of the best World Cup viewing experience, one London pub has decided to stand out from the crowd. The Jameson, a local pub located in the London suburb of Hammersmith, has temporarily renamed itself The Trump Arms. Certainly an eye-catching change, the pub has now been redecorated, transforming itself with American star-spangled banners, interspersed with Union Jacks. A sign above the door reads, “Welcome our American friends.”  

It would seem they certainly are welcome. Jameson, sorry, The Trump Arms, is holding a grand reopening on Friday the 13th of July, an invitation-only event and then an all-day affair on Saturday, £32 a head entrance for this one. Is it a jest, or a marketing ploy? No, the owner and many of its patrons are pro-Trump and truly sincere in celebrating his first visit to the UK.  

So, if you fancy a drink on Saturday and prefer celebrating a day of politics rather than surrounding yourself in World Cup madness, The Trump Arms will welcome you and your £32 with open arms. 

Others seem a little less excited about Trump’s visit, protests aside, surprising lifestyle choices are being made in lieu of the President’s approach. For those less in favour of the world leader, a choice has been made. Rather than attempting to ‘make America great again,’ they are making an attempt to make Green Day great again. The American band, who often see their 2004 hit, Wake Me Up When September Ends rise in popularity every September, have had an earlier revival this year as Brit’s flood to purchase their other massive 2004 hit, American Idiot.  

It began with a twitter account, entitled American Idiot for No. 1 When Trump Visits. The whole aim of the account was to encourage people to purchase and stream the Green Day hit that mocks ‘red-neck’ culture in the hope that the single will remain at number one in the charts for the whole of the President’s visit.  

The single currently sits at number one on Amazon and Google Play. The British public have really taken up the task. Currently sitting at number three on iTunes, there is still work to be done by those less in favour of the commander-in-chief’s visit. 

What other fun events have been planned for Trump’s visit? Well, there are various protests planned around the country while in London, the Mayor Sadiq Khan has given the go ahead to parade a giant balloon of Donald Trump, portrayed as a baby in a nappy. Even British politicians do not hold politics sacred, it would appear. 

So be it with joy or cynicism there is certainly an excitement felt by the British public surrounding Trump’s visit. However, the amount of energy exerted by the British public for this is highly reliant on how their team fares in the World Cup semi-finals. 

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