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Venezuela Government and Opposition Agree to Resume Talks

Politics

7Dnews London

Fri, 12 Jul 2019 14:55 GMT

Venezuela's government and opposition have both agreed to set up a platform for ongoing talks after three days of negotiations in Barbados, in a bid to put an end to the months-long standoff between the two sides in the crisis-racked country, AFP has reported, on Friday July 12th.

Representatives of President Nicolas Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaido met from Monday July 8th, to Wednesday July 10th, in the Caribbean island nation for negotiations, which Maduro said had been successful. 

The talks in Barbados, with the mediation of Norway, are considered the second round of negotiations after Oslo's meetings in May reached a deadlock.

"After an intense day of work, we developed six points with the government of Norway and the opposition," Maduro said Thursday July 11th, in a television and radio interview.

Norway's Foreign Minister, Ine Eriksen Soreide, said earlier in a statement that the two sides had established a negotiation table that will "work in a continuous and efficient manner to reach an agreed-upon solution within the framework of the Constitution.

"It is foreseen that the parties will carry out consultations in order to advance the negotiations," the statement added.

The Venezuelan government negotiator, Hector Rodriguez, said that a “complex path” forward was expected, but he was hopeful of “an agreement of democratic co-existence” with mutual recognition from both sides.

Guaido’s representative Stalin Gonzalez said on Twitter that Venezuelans need "answers and results," and said his delegation would "make consultations toward progress and putting an end to the suffering."

Venezuela has been in a political impasse since January, when Guaido declared himself acting president, quickly receiving the support of more than 50 countries. The country has been in recession for five years, despite its oil reserves, with food and medicine shortages, and failing public utilities. The United Nations has declared that a quarter of Venezuela’s population of 30 million need aid, and its estimated that three million people have left the country since 2016. 

Representatives of President Nicolas Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaido met from Monday July 8th, to Wednesday July 10th, in the Caribbean island nation for negotiations, which Maduro said had been successful.

The talks in Barbados, with the mediation of Norway, are considered the second round of negotiations after Oslo's meetings in May reached a deadlock.

"After an intense day of work, we developed six points with the government of Norway and the opposition," Maduro said Thursday July 11th, in a television and radio interview.

Norway's Foreign Minister, Ine Eriksen Soreide, said earlier in a statement that the two sides had established a negotiation table that will "work in a continuous and efficient manner to reach an agreed-upon solution within the framework of the Constitution.

"It is foreseen that the parties will carry out consultations in order to advance the negotiations," the statement added.

The Venezuelan government negotiator, Hector Rodriguez, said that a “complex path” forward was expected, but he was hopeful of “an agreement of democratic co-existence” with mutual recognition from both sides.

Guaido’s representative Stalin Gonzalez said on Twitter that Venezuelans need "answers and results," and said his delegation would "make consultations toward progress and putting an end to the suffering."

Venezuela has been in a political impasse since January, when Guaido declared himself acting president, quickly receiving the support of more than 50 countries. The country has been in recession for five years, despite its oil reserves, with food and medicine shortages, and failing public utilities. The United Nations has declared that a quarter of Venezuela’s population of 30 million need aid, and its estimated that three million people have left the country since 2016.


Latin America