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Tue, 21 Jan 2020 14:41 GMT

The Cookery Book: A British Twist on Hummus and Falafel Wraps

Lifestyle & Health

Hannah Bardsley - 7Dnews London

Tue, 14 Jan 2020 19:50 GMT

How much do you love chickpeas? Most people don’t really think about loving chickpeas, but they do think about loving hummus. The world is currently enamoured of hummus.

English folk singer Tom Rosenthal even wrote a song about it called, ‘Big Pot of Hummus’. It’s all about how life may be hard, but at least you have a big pot of hummus in your fridge. 

Well this recipe is chickpeas on top of chickpeas. But one’s warm and crunchy and the other soft, creamy and spicy. 

This is a rather British take on the recipe, I thought I should make that clear now. So, apologies if some of the ingredients sound a bit different from usual but believe me when I say that they all work together wonderfully.

You may be wondering why there is no sign of the tahini in the video, that’s because there seemed to be none to be found on the day. If this is the case for you, add a tablespoon of sesame oil to achieve the taste. Just don’t add too much, otherwise you’ll have a hummus that tastes a little like stir fry, I learnt that the hard way. 

Ingredients

Hummus

1 drained tin of chickpeas

1 tbsp of tahini

3 tbsps of olive oil

2 tbsps of water

8 sundried tomatoes, roughly chopped

2 small birds’ eye chillies, de-seeded and roughly chopped

2 cloves of garlic, finely diced

1 tsp of paprika

Salt and pepper to taste

Falafel

2 drained tins of chickpeas

1 red onion, quartered and thinly sliced

zest of 1 lemon

a bunch of coriander, finely chopped

1 tsp of sage

1 tsp of thyme

3 cloves of garlic, minced

½ tsp of cayenne pepper

4 tbsps of plain flour

Olive oil for frying

Method

The hummus is relatively simple to make. Once all ingredients have been prepared throw them all into a food processor and blitz them until the hummus has a smooth creamy consistency. Pour into a bowl, ready to serve.

The falafel is a little more involved but still surprisingly easy to make. Pour the chickpeas into a large bowl and begin to mash them with a potato masher until they are soft and broken down. 

Pour the rest of the ingredients into the bowl and using your hands, knead everything together, until the ‘dough’ is evenly mixed through.  

Then take portions of the dough and roll them into flattened circles, each one to two centimetres thick and five centimetres in diameter to create patties. 

Place a frying pan on medium to high heat and pour in olive oil so that base of the pan is completely covered. Once the oil is hot, carefully place the falafel patties into the pan. Cook until golden and crisp on one side, then carefully flip and cook until golden on the other. This should take a rough total of 10 minutes. 

Once cooked, place on kitchen paper to soak up the oil.  

Serve while still warm. Smearing the hummus over the centre of a bread wrap and filling with the falafel, salad greens and whatever else you fancy adding in. Plum tomatoes and avocados would be my suggestion. 


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