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Tue, 12 Nov 2019 05:13 GMT

Germany Plans to Host International Conference on Libya

Counterterrorism & Security

7Dnews London

Wed, 11 Sep 2019 23:05 GMT

Germany's ambassador to Libya said on Wednesday, September 11th that his country plans to host a conference about Libya in accordance with the United Nations in order to stabilise the oil-producing country, amid a fierce civil war to control the capital city of Tripoli.

The conference is the first diplomatic attempt to contain the troubling situation since the ground offensive launched by the Libyan National Army (LNA) to seize Tripoli, which is currently controlled by Fayez al-Serraj's government, reported Reuters. 

The current fight between LNA forces and the armed militia loyal to al-Serraj has displaced more than 120,000 people and thwarted United Nations (UN) peacekeeping efforts. 

UN Libya envoy Ghassan Salame had previously revealed plans to organise an international conference to bring together foreign powers backing the warring parties in Libya, without specifying a location. 

"Germany, therefore, initiated a consultation process with key international partners. With sufficient preparatory work these efforts could lead towards a meaningful international event this fall," Oliver Owcza, Germany's ambassador to Libya, said on Twitter. 

Owcza did not give further details on the event announced after German Chancellor Angela Merkel addressed the situation in the North African county during a speech in the parliament, saying that the crisis in Libya risk to destabilise the whole of Africa. 

Diplomatic sources claimed the event would be held in Berlin in October or November. 

Libya's conflict has increasingly become a proxy war between foreign powers which have been backing various armed group since the 2011 uprising against Muammar Gaddafi. The former rebels have been fighting each other ever since. 

Salame perceives Germany to be impartial in the current conflict in Libya, unlike France and Italy, which competed for Libya's wealth of oil and gas. 


Middle East Europe